Prepping Your Pittsburgh

LAWN

FOR SPRING

When spring is in the air, you'll see the first crocuses or daffodils return, marking the coming of the season. These signs should also signal to you that it's time to get your lawn ready for the growing season. 

Here are eight tasks you should complete in the spring to foster a healthy lawn.

RAKE DEEPLY

Raking is the first thing you need to do when getting your lawn ready for new growth. It's a good idea to remove the grass blades that died over the winter to prevent that dead grass turning  into a thatch layer that chokes out  new growth.

1

BONUS TIPS:

- Use a flexible leaf rake rather than a stiff metal one, which could damage young plants.

- Look out for matted patches of lawn caused by snow mold, raking can solve this problem.

AERATE IF NECESSARY

If soil is compacted to the point that existing grass can't grow, it may be necessary to aerate in the spring.

2

CAUTION TIPS:

- Generally, spring aerating is discouraged because the aeration holes provide a perfect spot for weed seeds to germinate.

- If you must aerate in the spring, consider doing it around Memorial  Day, after weeds have started  growing but before they  go to seed.

ASSESS THE SOIL

Contact your local county extension office to perform a soil test to figure out your soils pH levels. All you have  to do is call, check on their website,  or visit your local extension office,  and they can advise you on what  you'll need.

3

OVERSEED

Although typically done during autumn, spring overseeding is needed at times. Overseeding is the process of sowing seed over existing grass.

4

BONUS TIPS:

- Apply a slow-release nitrogen fertilizer (starter fertilizer).

- Keep the new seed moist until it is actively growing.

FERTILIZE

Lawns can be fertilized by topdressing with compost or using a mulching mower to chop lawn clippings into a nourishing source of nitrogen. Scotts Miracle-Gro Company also provides a widely accepted schedule for fertilizing lawns that includes a spring feeding.

5

BONUS TIPS:

- A lighter feeding in spring and a heavier one in late fall for cool-season grasses is recommended.

- Too much fertilizer in spring can lead to disease and weed problem.

- If you fertilized in late  fall, then your lawn still  has fertilizer to feed  on in spring.

APPLY PRE- EMERGENT HERBICIDE

For those who prefer weed-free lawns, spring lawn care is as much about weed prevention as it is about fostering healthy lawn growth.

6

BONUS TIPS WHEN APPLYING:

- To fight crabgrass, you may  need to apply both pre and post emergent herbicide.

- Don't plan on doing any core aeration until the fall.

- Wait until early fall to do  your overseeding with  turfgrass seed.

The best way to apply chemical herbicides is spot-spraying weeds rather than over-spraying the entire lawn. There are also A variety of weed-popper tools to help you manually pull out weeds.

7

APPLY POST-EMERGENT HERBICIDE

(OR PULL SPRING WEEDS)

SERVICE THE  LAWN MOWER

Spring also means it's time to get out the lawn mower and give it a once over. Start it up; stubborn start-ups are a sign that it might be due for a tune-up.

8

BONUS TIPS:

- Among the key tune-up tasks is sharpening the mower blade.

- Give your mower a tune-up  once a year.

Eichenlaub can help you with your landscaping needs. We have the trained and certified personnel, experience, knowledge, and equipment to cultivate a thriving environment on your property. Our comprehensive care allows you to enjoy your landscape, secure in the knowledge that we are attending to  its needs. The right tools in the right hands is the Eichenlaub difference.